World Library  



Penn State University's Electronic Classics Series Collection


PSU's Electronic Classics Series, Great Literary Works in PDF Penn State's Electronic Classics: The PSU's Electronic Classics Series Site was created and is maintained by Jim Manis. These files include original work published in hard copy by the Pennsylvania State University and classical works of literature in English.

 
  • Cover Image

The Altar of the Dead : The Beast in the Jungle; The Birthplace, A...

By: Henry James

Excerpt: Chapter 1. He had a mortal dislike, poor Stransom, to lean anniversaries, and loved them still less when they made a pretence of a figure. Celebrations and suppressions were equally painful to him, and but one of the former found a place in his life. He had kept each year in his own fashion the date of Mary Antrim?s death. It would be more to the point perhaps to say that this occasion kept him: it kept him at least effectually from doing anything else. It took ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

American Notes for General Circulation

By: Charles Dickens

Excerpt: It is nearly eight years since this book was first published. I present it, unaltered, in the Cheap Edition; and such of my opinions as it expresses, are quite unaltered too. My readers have opportunities of judging for themselves whether the influences and tendencies which I distrust in America, have any existence not in my imagination. They can examine for themselves whether there has been anything in the public career of that country during these past eight y...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Amazing Marriage

By: George Meredith

Excerpt: Chapter 1. Enter Dame Gossip As Chorus. Everybody has heard of the beautiful Countess of Cressett, who was one of the lights of this country at the time when crowned heads were running over Europe, crying out for charity?s sake to be amused after their tiresome work of slaughter: and you know what a dread they have of moping. She was famous for her fun and high spirits besides her good looks, which you may judge of for yourself on a walk down most of our great n...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Ambassadors

By: Henry James

Excerpt: Volume I. Preface: Nothing is more easy than to state the subject of ?The Ambassadors,? which first appeared in twelve numbers of The North American Review (1903) and was published as a whole the same year. The situation involved is gathered up betimes, that is in the second chapter of Book Fifth, for the reader?s benefit, into as few words as possible-- planted or ?sunk,? stiffly and saliently, in the centre of the current, almost perhaps to the obstruction of traffic.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Amelia

By: Henry Fielding

Introduction: Fielding?s third great novel has been the subject of much more discordant judgments than either of its forerunners. If we take the period since its appearance as covering four generations, we find the greatest authority in the earliest, Johnson, speaking of it with something more nearly approaching to enthusiasm than he allowed himself in reference to any other work of an author, to whom he was on the whole so unjust.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The American

By: Henry James

Excerpt: Chapter 1. On a brilliant day in May, in the year 1868, a gentle man was reclining at his ease on the great circular divan which at that period occupied the centre of the Salon Carre, in the Museum of the Louvre. This commodious ottoman has since been removed, to the extreme regret of all weak-kneed lovers of the fine arts, but the gentleman in question had taken serene possession of its softest spot, and, with his head thrown back and his legs outstretched, was...

Read More
  • Cover Image

American Notes

By: Rudyard Kipling

Introduction: In an issue of the London World in April, 1890, there appeared the following paragraph: ?Two small rooms connected by a tiny hall afford sufficient space to contain Mr. Rudyard Kipling, the literary hero of the present hour, ?the man who came from nowhere,? as he says himself, and who a year ago was consciously nothing in the literary world.?

Read More
  • Cover Image

A Message from the Sea

By: Charles Dickens

Excerpt: Chapter 1. The Village ?AND A MIGHTY SING?LAR and pretty place it is, as ever I saw in all the days of my life!? said Captain Jorgan, looking up at it. Captain Jorgan had to look high to look at it, for the village was built sheer up the face of a steep and lofty cliff. There was no road in it, there was no wheeled vehicle in it, there was not a level yard in it. From the sea-beach to the cliff-top two irregular rows of white houses, placed opposite to one anoth...

Read More
  • Cover Image

THE BOOKOF AMOS

By: Various

THE THIRTIETH BOOK OF THE HOLY BIBLE CONTAINING THE OLD AND NEW TESTAMENTS TRANSLATED OUT OF THE ORIGINAL TONGUES AND WITH THE FORMER TRANSLATIONS DILIGENTLY COMPARED & REVISED SET FORTH IN 1611 AND COMMONLY KNOWN AS THE KING JAMES VERSION

Excerpt: Chapter 1. The words of Amos, who was among the herdmen of Tekoa, which he saw concerning Israel in the days of Uzziah king of Judah, and in the days of Jeroboam the son of Joash king of Israel, two years before the earthquake -- 2. And he said, The LORD will roar from Zion, and utter his voice from Jerusalem; and the habitations of the shepherds shall mourn, and the top of Carmel shall wither.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Amy Foster

By: Joseph Conrad

Excerpt: Kennedy is a country doctor, and lives in Colebrook, on the shores of Eastbay. The high ground rising abruptly behind the red roofs of the little town crowds the quaint High Street against the wall which defends it from the sea. Beyond the sea-wall there curves for miles in a vast and regular sweep the barren beach of shingle, with the village of Brenzett standing out darkly across the water, a spire in a clump of trees; and still further out the perpendicular c...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Analysis of Mind

By: Bertrand Russell

Excerpt: Muirhead Library Of Philosophy. An admirable statement of the aims of the Library of Philosophy was provided by the first editor, the late Professor J. H. Muirhead, in his description of the original programme printed in Erdmann?s History of Philosophy under the date 1890. This was slightly modified in subsequent volumes to take the form of the following statement:

Read More
  • Cover Image

Androcles and the Lion

By: George Bernard Shaw

Excerpt: A jungle path. A lion?s roar, a melancholy suffering roar, comes from the jungle. It is repeated nearer. The lion limps from the jungle on three legs, holding up his right forepaw, in which a huge thorn sticks. He sits down and contemplates it. He licks it. He shakes it. He tries to extract it by scraping it along the ground, and hurts himself worse. He roars piteously. He licks it again. Tears drop from his eyes. He limps painfully off the path and lies down un...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Where Angels Fear to Tread

By: E.M. Forster

Excerpt: Chapter 1. They were all at Charing Cross to see Lilia off-- Philip, Harriet, Irma, Mrs. Herriton herself. Even Mrs. Theobald, squired by Mr. Kingcroft, had braved the journey from Yorkshire to bid her only daughter good-bye. Miss Abbott was likewise attended by numerous relatives, and the sight of so many people talking at once and saying such different things caused Lilia to break into ungovernable peals of laughter.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Compleat Angler

By: Izaak Walton

Excerpt: I have made so ill use of your former favors, as by them to be encouraged to entreat, that they may be enlarged to the patronage and protection of this Book: and I have put on a modest confidence, that I shall not be denied, because it is a discourse of Fish and Fishing, which you know so well, and both love and practice so much.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Annajanska the Bolshevik Empress

By: George Bernard Shaw

Excerpt: Annajanska is frankly a bravura piece. The modern variety theatre demands for its ?turns? little plays called sketches, to last twenty minutes or so, and to enable some favorite performer to make a brief but dazzling appearance on some barely passable dramatic pretext. Miss Lillah McCarthy and I, as author and actress, have helped to make one another famous on many serious occasions, from Man and Superman to Androcles; and Mr. Charles Ricketts has not disdained ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Ann Veronica a Modern Love Story

By: H.G. Wells

Excerpt: Part 1. One Wednesday afternoon in late September, Ann Veronica Stanley came down from London in a state of solemn excitement and quite resolved to have things out with her father that very evening. She had trembled on the verge of such a resolution before, but this time quite definitely she made it. A crisis had been reached, and she was almost glad it had been reached. She made up her mind in the train home that it should be a decisive crisis. It is for that r...

Read More
  • Cover Image

An Old Maid

By: Honore De Balzac

Excerpt: As a testimony to the affection of his brother-in-law?

Read More
  • Cover Image

Another Study of Woman

By: Honore De Balzac

Excerpt: At Paris there are almost always two separate parties going on at every ball and rout. First, an official party, composed of the persons invited, a fashionable and much-bored circle. Each one grimaces for his neighbor?s eye; most of the younger women are there for one person only; when each woman has assured herself that for that one she is the handsomest woman in the room, and that the opinion is perhaps shared by a few others, a few insignificant phrases are e...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: PHILO: Nay, but this dotage of our general?s overflows the measure: those his goodly eyes, That o?er the files and musters of the war Have glow?d like plated Mars, now bend, now turn, The office and devotion of their view Upon a tawny front: his captain?s heart, Which in the scuffles of great fights hath burst The buckles on his breast, reneges all temper, And is become the bellows and the fan To cool a gipsy?s lust.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Apology

By: Plato

Excerpt: How you have felt, O men of Athens, at hearing the speeches of my accusers, I cannot tell; but I know that their persuasive words almost made me forget who I was - such was the effect of them; and yet they have hardly spoken a word of truth. But many as their falsehoods were, there was one of them which quite amazed me; - I mean when they told you to be upon your guard, and not to let yourselves be deceived by the force of my eloquence. They ought to have been a...

Read More
 
1
|
2
|
3
|
4
|
5
Records: 41 - 60 of 1,084 - Pages: 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from National Public Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.